Home Cultural Exploration New Brunswick’s Colors of Acadian History

New Brunswick’s Colors of Acadian History

by Jessie Voigts

Along the Acadian coast, in Eastern New Brunswick, Canada, sits a national treasure. It’s the Village Historique Acadien – Acadian Historical Village (VHA). Located a few miles east of Caraquet, the VHA is a living history museum, one that portrays the lives of Acadians from 1770-1949.

New Brunswick's Colors of Acadian History

A farm at the Village Historique Acadien – Acadian Historical Village

The Acadians were the very first French settlers in North America, but there was a horrible deportation policy, called the Grand Derangement, that exiled them elsewhere (including to Louisiana – they’re now called Cajuns there), and marginalized the ones that were left.

Acadians are proud of their history, of keeping culture and tradition together despite all odds. It’s important to learn both their cultural and practical histories.

Living history with a horse and cart at New Brunswick's Acadian History Village

Horse and cart at the Village Historique Acadien – Acadian Historical Village

At VHA, there are over 40 historical buildings, plenty of fresh air and walking paths, and my favorite part, costumed interpreters. These actors bring the past to life, in living color.

Take a look at some of the colors of this rich Acadian history

Costumed actor at a house from 1855 at New Brunswick's Acadian Historical Village

Historical interpreter at a house from 1855 at the Village Historique Acadien – Acadian Historical Village

The colors of the Acadian flag welcome you to the Village Historique Acadien

The colors of the Acadian flag welcome you to the Village Historique Acadien

The Village Historique Acadien, Caraquet, New Brunswick, Canada

Welcome to the Village Historique Acadien

Even nature shares the reds of the Acadian flag at the Village Historique Acadien

Even nature shares the reds of the Acadian flag

Follow the path of New Brunswick's history at Village Historique Acadien

Follow the path (1846, here) of New Brunswick’s history at Village Historique Acadien

Looking through a door at Village Historique Acadien

Even with this vintage broom, the floor is clean!

Historic house and barn (1860) at Village Historique Acadien

Historic house and barn (1860) at Village Historique Acadien

An historical re-enactor making bread at the Village Historique Acadien

Inside, this historical re-enactor was making bread!

Not all residents of the Village Historique Acadien are actors... a friendly cow on a farm

Not all residents of the Village Historique Acadien are actors…

Duck, Duck, Goose! Penned up geese on the river (with a few escapees) - Village Historique Acadien

Duck, Duck, Goose! Penned up geese on the river (with a few escapees)

Plenty of wood for the winter. Village Historique Acadien

Plenty of wood for the winter.

A newer house (1890) at Village Historique Acadien

A newer house (1890) at Village Historique Acadien

An old (1900) covered bridge divided more than time periods at Village Historique Acadien

An old (1900) covered bridge divided more than time periods at Village Historique Acadien

 Oil Company and gas station, 1936; Hotel Chateau Albert, 1907 at the Village Historique Acadien


Oil Company and gas station, 1936; Hotel Chateau Albert, 1907 at the Village Historique Acadien

 

Have you visited the Acadian Historical Village? What was your favorite part?

 

Learn more:

http://www.villagehistoriqueacadien.com/en

http://www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca/Products/V/Village-Historique-Acadien-Product.aspx

Acadian History Comes Alive in a New Brunswick Village

 

 

Jessie Voigts has a PhD in International Education, has lived and worked in Japan and London, and traveled around the world. She’s published six books about travel and intercultural learning, with more on the way. Jessie is constantly looking for ways to increase intercultural understanding, and is passionate sharing the world through her site, Wandering Educators. She founded and directs the Youth Travel Blogging Mentorship Program, teaching teens all around the world.

Story and photos copyright Wandering Educators 2015.

 

 

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10 comments

Agness of eTramping April 24, 2017 at 12:57 pm

I’ve always been amazed by the Acadian history! Great post, Penny!

Reply
Penny Sadler May 6, 2017 at 6:17 pm

Thanks Agnes, this is one of Jessie’s articles actually. I love it too.

Reply
Elisabeth mobile March 30, 2016 at 7:21 am

Outstanding !!

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Lillie December 8, 2015 at 9:26 pm

Since the English teacher I work next to has been teaching “Evangeline,” I’ve been interested in Acadian history. Neat to know that this is the place to dive into it!

Reply
Mary @ Green Global Travel December 6, 2015 at 12:14 pm

I’m fascinated by Acadian history and wasn’t aware of the terrible deportation policy until we visited the Cajun museum in Louisiana. Thanks for sharing your photos of Acadian culture.

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Penny Sadler December 8, 2015 at 12:56 pm

Thanks for the comment Mary!

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Sandra Foyt December 2, 2015 at 3:27 pm

This looks fascinating! I bet it would make a great road trip destination from Northeast USA.

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Penny Sadler December 3, 2015 at 11:17 am

I agree!

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Cathy Sweeney November 30, 2015 at 9:17 pm

Acadian history is so interesting. Would love to visit the Acadian Historical Village — looks like a great experience. I enjoyed delving into a bit of Acadian history in Nova Scotia last year at Grand-Pré National Historic Site.

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Penny Sadler December 3, 2015 at 11:17 am

An area I can’t wait to explore. Thanks for the comment!

Reply

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